International Style in Savannah

International Style in Savannah

Savannah’s Landmark Historic District is well known for it’s distinctive city plan, beautiful squares, and plethora of commercial and residential buildings from the 18th and 19th centuries.  Other than a few notable exceptions such as the Municipal Building on Broughton Street, Savannah does not have many examples of International Style architecture.

Unlike it’s Baroque, Victorian, and Art Noveau predecessors, International Style architecture is utilitarian.   It was developed in the 1920s and 30s in Western Europe and the United States by the likes of Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Walter Gropius, LeCorbusier, Philip Johnson and Louis Kahn.  The movement, which is tied to Bauhaus, Functionalism and Modernism, utilizes steel, glass and concrete, and is commonly summed up in these three slogans:
ORNAMENT IS A CRIME

TRUTH TO MATERIALS

FORM FOLLOWS FUNCTION
When the Old Candler Hospital was on East Huntingdon Street (at Drayton), a pump house for the utility panels and  boiler room was built to accommodate the large hospital facility.  501 Abercorn Street (pictured above) was that pump house.  Talk about form following function!  We can easily imagine a brilliant renovation here, topped with an all glass and steel penthouse with roof deck overlooking Forsyth Park.  Click HERE to learn more.

 

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